HOLY WEEK MASS SCHEDULE (On-line Only)

All Masses and Services will be on-line via Facebook Live.  


April 5:     Palm Sunday Mass    9:30AM from St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Grand Rivers

April 9:     Holy Thursday Mass 6:00PM from St. Pius X Parish, Calvert City

April 10:   Good Friday Stations of the Cross  2:00PM from St. Pius X Parish, Calvert City

April 10:   Good Friday Service  6:00PM from St. Anthony of Padua Parish, Grand Rivers

April 12:   EASTER SUNDAY    9:30AM from St. Pius X Parish, Calvert City


April 5, 2020

Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion

Today's Activities & Tasks

  • Read Today's Readings
  • Fr. Brian's Palm Sunday Homily
  • Holy Week On-Line Mass Schedule
  • ​UPDATED Blessed Palms Information
  • WATCH Holy Week, Holy People film: 

​​          "St. Benedict, The Monk" from Pivotal Players

On the Facebook feed, click on the "St. Pius X & St. Anthony of Padua Churches" at the top of the box.  This should take you directly to our Facebook page.

The information on this page will be updated everyday by 7:00am while we are dealing with the Corona Virus Pandemic.  It is our hope that information given on our website will be helpful for you, your family and your friends.

​​St. Pius X Catholic Church

Calvert City, KY

MATTHEW 26:14-27


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Have a wonderful day!

Welcome to the Daily Information Page for

St. Pius X Parish! 

 


HOLY WEEK, HOLY PEOPLE
​​This Holy Week, let us reflect on those holy people who came before us.
Journey with Bishop Barron as he uncovers the incredible life of St. Benedict, the "cave-dwelling kid" who changed the course of Western Civilization!  Many would argue that St. Benedict contributed more to saving Western Christian culture than anyone else.

Today only, watch Bishop Barron's full feature length film St. Benedict: The Monk for FREE right here:
https://pivotalplayers.com/holy-week-watch


Fr. Brian Johnson's Palm Sunday Homily:


I begin today by offering prayer for all the dedicated, selfless souls who are working what we call the front lines in this virus pandemic-- our nurses, doctors, aides-Emt and first responders giving care to the sick. We think of them, & thank God for motivating them and ask his continued protection over them. And all of our public facing business associates in the food, fuel and other necessary need stores. May God help them and their families. We need them and pray for them. And for our sick, we pray for them and let them know in any way we can, that we are with them in prayer, hoping for their recovery and the day we visit them again in person. God-willing that day is not too far away. So we do what we can. Pray.

            When I hear the Passion Accounts, I always think to myself, “What is Jesus going to do with us?” We, human beings, are such a funny group. Just look at the 180 degree turn, flip-flop in attitude, from Matthew 21:9-11, when the people celebrated Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem with shouts and glad cries, ‘Hosanna, Blessed is the one coming in the Name of the Lord’ to then, today in Matthew  27:22-23, two times they call out cruelly, “Let him be crucified.” Who can satisfy us humans? Not even God. Thinking of Jesus riding into the city on a donkey made me think of a story about how sometimes people just can’t be pleased-there’s no satisfying everyone. The story is told about a boy who was taking a donkey from the farm to the market, and as he was walking him in to town, a man passed and asked where he was going. After learning they were going to market, he said, “Well, you are going to sell him, so get your last dollar’s ride out of him-give your feet a break.” So the boy got onto the donkey’s back and went a little further down road. Another man passed him and asked where they were going, and the boy told him he was selling the donkey. And the man scolded him and said, “Don’t ride him, you may hurt him. And, give that donkey a break, it may be his last walk.” So the boy got off him again, reached down and picked up the donkey and put the donkey on his own shoulders and carried him the rest of the way into town! There’s No pleasing the crowds. Same with today’s gospel and the crowd that represents all of us wayward and sinful humans.

            I know the reading is long; it is basically two whole chapters, 26 & 27 of Matthew’s gospel. There are a lot of details in it, a lot of intrigue, a lot of action & a lot of sin. A lesson in it all for me is this: Sometimes in the middle of a mess, you find the greatest grace; like a treasure in the center of a junk drawer (which brings up an experience from this isolating quarantine period--a challenge I’ve given myself and offered to others is to take this down-time to pick and clean out a special catch-all drawer, closet or even a whole garage while you have the time at home. You may find what you have been missing. But again, my point is that sometimes in the heart of havoc, that is where you find the greatest gift. So deeply buried (literally, Friday) in the passion of Our Lord, is our greatest grace. And that is, Jesus’ faithfulness to us; His never giving up on us, though we may deny and desert Him, He doesn’t let go of us. He comes back to us, over and over again. Even with all the detail of Jesus’ set-up, arrest, trial, torture and execution, there is embedded in the middle of all that, a great meditation: That Jesus knows us and loves us even more because of our sinful waywardness. Even when we tell him point blank our self-serving egotistical justifications to sinfully oppose & reject Him, He loves us through it. Jesus faces the worst of humanity in this reading, in all the gory, gruesome cruelty of His torture and death, but also in the psychological pain of friends denying, lying, and even betraying him to the enemy. But the best part of all, the good part disguised down in the middle of this reading, is Jesus’ covenantal sacrifice for us. We call it the Last Supper, the Holy Eucharist where he tells us ‘This is my body’ & ‘This is my blood’ given for you. While our actions will not show our union with Him (by our sinful choice), still his actions and his choice for us shows our union with Him.  Listening to the Passion of Jesus, it is as if Jesus is saying to us, “You are going to do terrible things to me; but I am still going to love you, and because I love you, you are going to be redeemed, and be made better”. I place my grace within your sin to bring you out

            In the actual reading, we will hear about nearly everyone hurting Jesus. Judas will betray and sell out Jesus to the Temple priests and cooperate in his arrest and seizure. Jesus will offer a loving warning that they may all be tempted to scatter or have their faith weakened. Yet, even faced with Jesus’ loving statement that he knows one among them will betray Him, they will all lie to Him professing their allegiance. Peter will go so far lying even to himself, swear a false boast that he never would leave Jesus. In the garden, Jesus will only ask the small favor of them staying close to Him for comfort and watch the time pass with Him, yet three times they will ignore Him and fall into sleep. Then in Matt 26:56, the disciples all flee, and in 26:70 Peter will begin his three-time denial of even ever knowing Jesus. Soldiers will mock and haze him through a coronation as king, the crowd will jeer and in general chaos the mob will bully him, curse and spit on Him, even the convicted criminals alongside Him will condemn Him. Then He will die and be buried. And that burying brings me back to my meditation that in the middle of all this mess, Jesus reveals to us Divine Love as a higher way of life, a fulfilled life, a life intended by God for the redemption of this world. It is the Holy Eucharist, the Mass, where Jesus gives His body as food for our salvation, and offers the cup of His blood as the covenant that ‘will be shed for many, for the forgiveness of sins.’ We have to look for that redemption, but Jesus shows it, and shares it with us in the middle of this mess. We look for God’s grace. He is here!



            

Blessed Palms - UPDATE


Palms will not be blessed on Sunday, April 5th.


From Fr Brian:

I am so sorry that I may have stepped out too far in trying to get Blessed Palm in as safe a way as possible to those desiring it, but due to a directive from the Bishop, we can not distribute Blessed Palm as I had earlier indicated. I am very sorry, and I will secure the Palm in the Church for some future distribution after all of this passes. Please keep tuned in to our regular video-live streamed prayers and masses, especially as we enter Holy Week.

Here is the full memo from the Diocese:
“Good afternoon Parishes, In these confusing and diffic
ult times when across the country we are seeing different liturgical practices, as we,  the Diocese of Owensboro are called to come together and be faithful to what our Bishop asks of us out of concern for the safety of those we minister to. It is important that no matter what is happening in other areas, we are doing absolutely everything we can to protect people as far as we are able from the very real and serious dangers that the Coronavirus presents. 

Bishop Medley is asking that we not do anything that will entice people to leave their homes at this time.  This means that palms are not to be distributed in any way, whether by drive-thru, or leaving them in the parish for people to come and pick up. They may be distributed when public worship is reinstated.  As a reminder, the Vatican has decreed that parishes are to use the third form for Palm Sunday, which does not include a blessing of palms.

Scheduling in-person confession times is also discouraged at this time. Please reiterate to parishioners that in-person confession is not required at this time because of our circumstances and that there is another path to reconciliation and grace. God’s mercy and forgiveness reaches us wherever we are, and the Church teaches us in the Catechism that an act of perfect contrition suffices for even mortal sins until we are able to safely come to sacramental Reconciliation (CCC 1452). We are asking that all parishes distribute the attached information about making an act of perfect contrition at home.


Confession and Indulgences Document


Thank you for all your efforts and sacrifices!  Please feel free to contact me with any questions. Lauren Johnson, Co-Coordinator | Office of Worship